Posts Tagged 'music business'

First Things First

(an excerpt from the SoundSessions training course)

WHAT IS IT THAT WE DO?
Being part of an audio team is a special privilege. We have the ability to affect everybody’s experience for the good or bad. We can really set up the people on the platform to win , or we can be an obstacle to their success. We have a high responsibility and the people on the platform are putting their trust in us that their artistic endeavors will arrive at the audience’s ears with a true representation – without us imposing our own preferences and biases.

We have two tasks that are equal in priority:
Provide a H O U S E  M I X that is representative of what’s happening on stage.
S E R V E the people on the platform so that they can do their best.

Pleasing other people can be important, but it cannot take precedence over the above goals. You have to know who it is you work for. Making the lead singer’s mother happy is not a consideration. Taking volume advice from the loud drunk at the festival or the cranky church Deacon is not recommended. But neither should we go to the other extreme and be rude to patrons. Just simply say “Thanks for your input, I’ll discuss it with the appropriate people.” B E   N I C E. There’s no need to escalate.

KNOW WHO IT IS YOU’RE WORKING FOR
In any performing arts situation, there is bound to be a lot of cooks in the kitchen. It is important to know who is in charge and what the chain of command is. It may be as simple as you working for the band. But it is also possible that there will be several levels of management over you, so make a point of trying to understand those subtleties and distinctions. If possible, try to get a grasp of that before you arrive. Here are some common scenarios:

BAR: Venue Owner > Sound Tech

CONCERT: Promoter > Band Leader > Sound Tech > Event Volunteers

MUSICAL: Theater Company > Auditorium Director > Tech Director > Sound Tech

CHURCH: Pastor > Create Arts Director > Music Director > Sound Tech

FESTIVAL: Festival Coordinator > Sound Company Rep > Sound Tech

Or, if you’re working directly for the band and in a festival type of situation, then your job would include some diplomacy and political skills so that you can provide what your band needs while also cooperating with others who may or may not have compatible agendas!

WHAT DOES IT REQUIRE?
Being a great audio engineer requires a few different skills, including:
– an understanding and P A S S I O N for the arts
– a K N O W L E D G E of the gear, how it works & interconnects
– a knowledge of the F R E Q U E N C Y spectrum and how it applies
– a basic understanding of E L E C T R I C A L needs and processes
– an organized mind that can track S I G N A L   F L O W and troubleshooting
– the ability to think like a M U S I C I A N and anticipate changes

DO YOU PLAY AN INSTRUMENT?
If not, it might be a good idea to take a few lessons. Having a foundational understanding of how music is performed and arranged could be a huge key to your success as a sound tech. Do you know what a verse, chorus, bridge, turnaround, build, half-time section, modulation, breakdown, second ending and coda are? If you want to work alongside musicians, then you better learn how to speak their language!

Advertisements

SoundSessions

Audio Training for Live Sound. All content ©2010 Jeremy Carter Consulting.

Topic Tags

SoundSessions on Twitter

  • Free 30 day trial: StagePlot Pro for Mac: stageplot.com---------- *** --------- 5 years ago
  • anyone actually seen the new Source Four LEDs in person? Thoughts?---------- *** --------- 5 years ago
  • sorry about the lack of tweets as of late. Been busy with the new job as a Sr. Tech with PSAV at Gaylord Opryland. Lots of audio here!---------- *** --------- 5 years ago
  • my transition from Indy to Nashville would be ever so much easier if Peyton were to become a Titan.---------- *** --------- 5 years ago
  • RT @churchsoundguy: How to LEGALLY share the Super Bowl at your church this weekend: is.gd/SYuX5E #fb---------- *** --------- 5 years ago

%d bloggers like this: